RAF Coningsby

RAF Coningsby is a Royal Air Force station located at located 13.7 kilometres (8.5 mi) south west of Horncastle, and 15.8 kilometres (9.8 mi) north west of Boston, in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England.

It is a Main Operating Base of the RAF and home to the Typhoon Force Headquarters and two front-line Eurofighter Typhoon FGR4 units, No. 3 Squadron & No. 11 Squadron.

In support of frontline units, No. 29 Squadron is the Typhoon Operational Conversion Unit and No. 41 Squadron is the Typhoon Operational Evaluation Unit.

Coningsby is also the home of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) which operates a variety of historic RAF aircraft.

Avro Vulcans arrived in 1962, which were transferred to RAF Cottesmore in November 1964.

Loyalty binds me

RAF Coningsby’s badge, awarded in December 1958, features a depiction of Tattershall Castle. The local landmark, dating from the 15th-century castle is located approximately 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) to the north-west of the station. The station’s motto is Loyalty binds me.

Today, RAF Coningsby is one of two RAF Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) Stations which protect UK airspace.
(RAF Lossiemouth is the other).

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