44 (Rhodesia) Squadron

Fulmina regis iusta – (The King’s thunderbolts are righteous)

Badge: On a mount an elephant. Based upon the seal of Lo Bengula, the chief of the Matabeles on conquest. The seal shows an elephant which, in the case of this unit, is intended to indicate heavy attacks.

Formed at Hainault Farm, Essex, on 24th July 1917, as a Home Defence Squadron. Title altered to ‘No. 44 (Rhodesia) Squadron’ in September
1941, in recognition of that country’s generous donations to the war effort. Equipped with Vulcans at Waddington in August 1960 until
December 1982.

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