50 Squadron

Sic fidem servamus – (Thus we keep faith)

Badge: A sword in bend severing a mantle palewise. This unit formed at Dover and adopted a mantle being severed by a sword to show its
connection with that town, the arms of which include St. Martin and the beggar with whom he divided his cloak. The mantle is also indicative of the protection given to this country by the Royal Air Force. The running dogs
device on squadron aircraft arose from the radio call sign Dingo that the squadron was allocated as part of the Home Defence network in 1918.


Formed at Dover, Kent, on 15 May 1916, as a Home Defence squadron. Equipped with Vulcans at Waddington in August 1961 until
March 1984.

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